Tuesday, September 2, 2014
beatonna:

addendum to previous post

beatonna:

addendum to previous post

Sunday, August 31, 2014
ancientpeoples:

Lion Headed Earring 
4th-3rd Century BC
Etruscan
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Lion Headed Earring 

4th-3rd Century BC

Etruscan

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

becausebirds:

MAKIN’ IT RAINNNN

becausebirds:

MAKIN’ IT RAINNNN

Saturday, August 30, 2014
daily-infographic:

Deaths from police shootingshttp://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/
lifeunderthewaves:

Selfie with style in Jellyfish lake by pnup65 The award winning photograph from DEEP Indonesia underwater photo contest 2014 in “Diver” Category.http://ift.tt/QMOxDT It’s selfie shot in famous jellyfish lake in Palau.

lifeunderthewaves:

Selfie with style in Jellyfish lake by pnup65 The award winning photograph from DEEP Indonesia underwater photo contest 2014 in “Diver” Category.
http://ift.tt/QMOxDT
It’s selfie shot in famous jellyfish lake in Palau.

Friday, August 29, 2014

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Edward Moran’s ethereally beautiful The Valley in the Sea, which he painted in 1862, is (as the title suggests) a landscape of a very unusual sort.

Full of beautiful little details, The Valley in the Sea depicts the floor of the ocean in eerie jewel tones reminiscent of nothing so much as Max Ernst’s Napoleon in the Wilderness.

While it isn’t surprising that—what with the 19th-century taste for dramatic landscapes in exotic locales—someone hit on the idea of depicting the ocean floor, the Indianapolis Museum of Art makes the intriguing suggestion that “Moran may have been inspired by underwater exploration related to the laying of the first successful telegraph cable in 1858.”

josharlington:

Patches, the polar bear.
Photographed at the Erie Zoo

josharlington:

Patches, the polar bear.

Photographed at the Erie Zoo

Thursday, August 21, 2014

(Source: gorillazme)

Wednesday, August 20, 2014
daily-infographic:

Space Without The Space - The Solar System’s Solid Surfaces Stitched Together (excluding dust and small rocks)http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/

daily-infographic:

Space Without The Space - The Solar System’s Solid Surfaces Stitched Together (excluding dust and small rocks)
http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

conservationbiologist:

3D Printed Hermit Crab Shells Depict Famous Landmarks
by ILFN
3D printing technology is completely amazing. The technology can be used to create prosthetic limbs for people or ducks, potential concrete infrastructure on Mars, tools for the ISS, replacement skulls or bones for facial reconstruction, replacement blood vessels, and much more. 
All of those uses are extremely worthwhile and noble, but 3D printers can also be used to make things that are just awesome and fun, like decked out shells for hermit crabs (the most adorable of crustaceans). Hermit crabs have soft, vulnerable bodies. Rather than make their own shells for protection, they will forage for shells left by other animals, and will switch homes quite often. If shells aren’t available, they’ll lug around bits of wood or even plastic bottle caps to protect themselves.
Artist Aki Inomata from Japan has created a collection of 3D printed shells out of clear plastic for her project, “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?”. While clear hermit crab shells have been done before, Inomata has given them a new twist by putting famous architecture from around the globe on the top of each one. She claims she was inspired by a piece of land that had held the French Embassy in Japan. Ownership of the land, she says, was peacefully transferred back and forth between France and Japan without causing a fuss. People also often move between countries, and even hermit crabs are able to seamlessly transfer from one home to the next.
# I love how art mixes with technology! These Dutch windmills look cute^^

conservationbiologist:

3D Printed Hermit Crab Shells Depict Famous Landmarks

by ILFN

3D printing technology is completely amazing. The technology can be used to create prosthetic limbs for people or ducks, potential concrete infrastructure on Marstools for the ISSreplacement skulls or bones for facial reconstructionreplacement blood vessels, and much more

All of those uses are extremely worthwhile and noble, but 3D printers can also be used to make things that are just awesome and fun, like decked out shells for hermit crabs (the most adorable of crustaceans). Hermit crabs have soft, vulnerable bodies. Rather than make their own shells for protection, they will forage for shells left by other animals, and will switch homes quite often. If shells aren’t available, they’ll lug around bits of wood or even plastic bottle caps to protect themselves.

Artist Aki Inomata from Japan has created a collection of 3D printed shells out of clear plastic for her project, “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?”. While clear hermit crab shells have been done before, Inomata has given them a new twist by putting famous architecture from around the globe on the top of each one. She claims she was inspired by a piece of land that had held the French Embassy in Japan. Ownership of the land, she says, was peacefully transferred back and forth between France and Japan without causing a fuss. People also often move between countries, and even hermit crabs are able to seamlessly transfer from one home to the next.

# I love how art mixes with technology! These Dutch windmills look cute^^