Thursday, August 21, 2014

(Source: gorillazme)

Wednesday, August 20, 2014
daily-infographic:

Space Without The Space - The Solar System’s Solid Surfaces Stitched Together (excluding dust and small rocks)http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/

daily-infographic:

Space Without The Space - The Solar System’s Solid Surfaces Stitched Together (excluding dust and small rocks)
http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

conservationbiologist:

3D Printed Hermit Crab Shells Depict Famous Landmarks
by ILFN
3D printing technology is completely amazing. The technology can be used to create prosthetic limbs for people or ducks, potential concrete infrastructure on Mars, tools for the ISS, replacement skulls or bones for facial reconstruction, replacement blood vessels, and much more. 
All of those uses are extremely worthwhile and noble, but 3D printers can also be used to make things that are just awesome and fun, like decked out shells for hermit crabs (the most adorable of crustaceans). Hermit crabs have soft, vulnerable bodies. Rather than make their own shells for protection, they will forage for shells left by other animals, and will switch homes quite often. If shells aren’t available, they’ll lug around bits of wood or even plastic bottle caps to protect themselves.
Artist Aki Inomata from Japan has created a collection of 3D printed shells out of clear plastic for her project, “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?”. While clear hermit crab shells have been done before, Inomata has given them a new twist by putting famous architecture from around the globe on the top of each one. She claims she was inspired by a piece of land that had held the French Embassy in Japan. Ownership of the land, she says, was peacefully transferred back and forth between France and Japan without causing a fuss. People also often move between countries, and even hermit crabs are able to seamlessly transfer from one home to the next.
# I love how art mixes with technology! These Dutch windmills look cute^^

conservationbiologist:

3D Printed Hermit Crab Shells Depict Famous Landmarks

by ILFN

3D printing technology is completely amazing. The technology can be used to create prosthetic limbs for people or ducks, potential concrete infrastructure on Marstools for the ISSreplacement skulls or bones for facial reconstructionreplacement blood vessels, and much more

All of those uses are extremely worthwhile and noble, but 3D printers can also be used to make things that are just awesome and fun, like decked out shells for hermit crabs (the most adorable of crustaceans). Hermit crabs have soft, vulnerable bodies. Rather than make their own shells for protection, they will forage for shells left by other animals, and will switch homes quite often. If shells aren’t available, they’ll lug around bits of wood or even plastic bottle caps to protect themselves.

Artist Aki Inomata from Japan has created a collection of 3D printed shells out of clear plastic for her project, “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?”. While clear hermit crab shells have been done before, Inomata has given them a new twist by putting famous architecture from around the globe on the top of each one. She claims she was inspired by a piece of land that had held the French Embassy in Japan. Ownership of the land, she says, was peacefully transferred back and forth between France and Japan without causing a fuss. People also often move between countries, and even hermit crabs are able to seamlessly transfer from one home to the next.

# I love how art mixes with technology! These Dutch windmills look cute^^

Sunday, August 17, 2014
thesneakytiki:

hamishmash:

I made a comic about Godzilla. 

Fantastic work!

thesneakytiki:

hamishmash:

I made a comic about Godzilla. 

Fantastic work!

(Source: hamishmash)

Marylin Monroe for Life Magazine and Richard Avedon, 1958

Marylin Monroe for Life Magazine and Richard Avedon, 1958

Saturday, August 16, 2014
rhamphotheca:

A Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violacea), in Florida, cools off in the pool of a surprised homeowner.
(via: The National Audubon Society)

rhamphotheca:

A Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violacea), in Florida, cools off in the pool of a surprised homeowner.

(via: The National Audubon Society)

rhamphotheca:

A Visual Compendium of Bioluminescent Creatures

Hi guys! My name is Eleanor and I’m a self-employed artist from Seattle. This blog post is the first installment of what will hopefully be a year-long infographic design project. I’ve always been into biology and design, so I’m taking a year off after college to see if I can combine the two with at least marginal success.
It’s more of an experiment than anything else, so feel free to leave comments about what works, what doesn’t, and what might be scientifically incorrect despite my best efforts. I spend a lot of time trying to make these infographics accurate (for this post I read a 468 page textbook and used over 200 other sources) but naturally I’m not an expert in every subject I write about.
Today’s post diagrams a few of the most well studied bioluminescent organisms. Hope you enjoy it, and thanks for stopping by :) 
[click image to see larger]

(via: Tabletop Whale)

rhamphotheca:

A Visual Compendium of Bioluminescent Creatures

Hi guys! My name is Eleanor and I’m a self-employed artist from Seattle. This blog post is the first installment of what will hopefully be a year-long infographic design project. I’ve always been into biology and design, so I’m taking a year off after college to see if I can combine the two with at least marginal success.

It’s more of an experiment than anything else, so feel free to leave comments about what works, what doesn’t, and what might be scientifically incorrect despite my best efforts. I spend a lot of time trying to make these infographics accurate (for this post I read a 468 page textbook and used over 200 other sources) but naturally I’m not an expert in every subject I write about.

Today’s post diagrams a few of the most well studied bioluminescent organisms. Hope you enjoy it, and thanks for stopping by :) 

[click image to see larger]

(via: Tabletop Whale)

Friday, August 15, 2014 Thursday, August 14, 2014
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Arapaima Swimming by Brandon Lee Dittsworth on Flickr.
postwhitesociety:

teethagoddess:

We at Howard University stand in solidarity with Ferguson.
Even our innocence is threatening.

Word to the Howard alumna who was shot in the head while protesting.

postwhitesociety:

teethagoddess:

We at Howard University stand in solidarity with Ferguson.

Even our innocence is threatening.

Word to the Howard alumna who was shot in the head while protesting.