Monday, April 14, 2014

(Source: fukkkres)

Sunday, April 13, 2014
Geogentor, “George’s Gate” of Dresden Castle in Dresden, Germany
Dresden Castle was originally built as an early medieval keep in the 1200’s. Over the next 800 years it has been up kept (ha) and remodeled as nearly every European power of the last 1000 years occupied it’s premises. It is now a celebrated piece of historical architecture and houses some of the most fascinating artifacts in all of European history. 
Photo Source

Geogentor, “George’s Gate” of Dresden Castle in Dresden, Germany

Dresden Castle was originally built as an early medieval keep in the 1200’s. Over the next 800 years it has been up kept (ha) and remodeled as nearly every European power of the last 1000 years occupied it’s premises. It is now a celebrated piece of historical architecture and houses some of the most fascinating artifacts in all of European history. 

Photo Source

somuchscience:

rhamphotheca:

'Coandu-mirim' | Coendou speratus • A new species of New World Porcupine, Genus Coendou (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) from the Atlantic forest of northeastern Brazil  [2013]

We report the discovery of a new species of Coendou (Rodentia, Erethizontidae), here designated Coendou speratus sp. nov. This small porcupine, locally known as ‘coandu-mirim’, is found in the Pernambuco Endemism Centre in the Atlantic coast of northeastern Brazil north of the São Francisco river, one of the most important known biodiversity hotspots. The geographic range of C. speratus overlaps with that of the larger, widespread C. prehensilis, but not with that of C. insidiosus from the southeastern Atlantic forest, nor with that of C. nycthemera, an eastern Amazonian species.

Coendou speratus is a small-bodied, long-tailed species that appears to be completely spiny because it lacks long dorsal fur. The dorsal quills have conspicuously brownish red tips that contrast with the blackish dorsal background color. The new species is overall similar to C. nycthemera, but the dorsal body quills are typically tricolored in the former and bicolored in the latter. The new species is externally very distinct from C. insidiosus, especially because the latter has bicolored dorsal quills that are almost completely hidden beneath longer and homogeneous pale or dark hairs.

(read more: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

Coendu genetics are so poorly understood that every new populations is a new species or every population is the same species. Dudoso…

Saturday, April 12, 2014
rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens. 
Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators. 
Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society: Sign the petition here.
(via: American Bird Conservancy)

rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens.

Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators.

Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society:

Sign the petition here.

(via: American Bird Conservancy)

Friday, April 11, 2014
dendroica:

A bulb field in Lisse bursts into colour. Lisse in The Netherlands is in the heart of the bulb flowering business and exports the product in large quantities to over a hundred countries around the world. Picture: EPA/LEX VAN LIESHOUT (via Pictures of the day: 2 April 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

A bulb field in Lisse bursts into colour. Lisse in The Netherlands is in the heart of the bulb flowering business and exports the product in large quantities to over a hundred countries around the world. Picture: EPA/LEX VAN LIESHOUT (via Pictures of the day: 2 April 2014 - Telegraph)


The Last Unicorn (1982)

The Last Unicorn (1982)

(Source: vintagegal)

Thursday, April 10, 2014
dendroica:

Candy Cane Snail (Liguus virgineus); Length 5,8 cm; Originating from Hispaniola; Shell of own collection, therefore not geocoded.
Photo by H. Zell.
Finalist for Wikimedia Picture of the Year 2013.

dendroica:

Candy Cane Snail (Liguus virgineus); Length 5,8 cm; Originating from Hispaniola; Shell of own collection, therefore not geocoded.

Photo by H. Zell.

Finalist for Wikimedia Picture of the Year 2013.

theatlantic:

The Nun Who Got Addicted to Twitter

“My superior is a gamer.” Sister Helena Burns said, laughing. “You know you’re a media nun when your superior is a gamer.” 
You might not expect nuns to be experts on Twitter, Facebook, and multi-player video games, but Burns defies all expectations. With 13,790 Twitter followers and counting, the Daughter of St. Paul calls herself a “media nun”: A woman religious with a calling to communicate the word of Christ, in any way she can.
And yes, there is a gamer-superior in her convent.
“She has this souped-up computer,” Burns continued. “She gets her own little ministry out there. Once people get to know she’s a nun, they have questions, or they ask for prayers. But you do have to clean up your language when Sister Irene’s out there.”
I imagine Sister Irene sitting in front of a sleek desktop with neon LED backlights, wearing her bright yellow Grado headphones and concentrating intensely on a multi-player RPG. It’s a funny image—there’s such a symbolic disconnect between the stereotypical idea of a nun and a basement-dwelling teenager who loves World of Warcraft. That’s what’s so fascinating about these sisters and their order: They defy stereotypes about who participates in Internet culture, and how.
So how does a nun use social media?
Read more. [Image courtesy of Helena Burns]

theatlantic:

The Nun Who Got Addicted to Twitter

“My superior is a gamer.” Sister Helena Burns said, laughing. “You know you’re a media nun when your superior is a gamer.” 

You might not expect nuns to be experts on Twitter, Facebook, and multi-player video games, but Burns defies all expectations. With 13,790 Twitter followers and counting, the Daughter of St. Paul calls herself a “media nun”: A woman religious with a calling to communicate the word of Christ, in any way she can.

And yes, there is a gamer-superior in her convent.

“She has this souped-up computer,” Burns continued. “She gets her own little ministry out there. Once people get to know she’s a nun, they have questions, or they ask for prayers. But you do have to clean up your language when Sister Irene’s out there.”

I imagine Sister Irene sitting in front of a sleek desktop with neon LED backlights, wearing her bright yellow Grado headphones and concentrating intensely on a multi-player RPG. It’s a funny image—there’s such a symbolic disconnect between the stereotypical idea of a nun and a basement-dwelling teenager who loves World of Warcraft. That’s what’s so fascinating about these sisters and their order: They defy stereotypes about who participates in Internet culture, and how.

So how does a nun use social media?

Read more. [Image courtesy of Helena Burns]

songs4lyf:

Led Zeppelin - Boogie With Stu